Mei-Wah Williams

Doctor of Philosophy, (Pyschology)
Study Completed: 2008
College of Humanities & Social Sciences

Citation

Thesis Title
Testing and Extending Self-control Theory of Crime

Ms Williams investigated and extended the self-control theory of crime. Low self-control is ranked as one of the strongest risk factors for crime but its lack of explanatory power has been a concern. Integrating self-control theory with the theory of planned behaviour led to the study’s aims: to ascertain the mechanism by which a person with low self-control is at greater risk for crime; and to increase the explanatory power of self-control theory. Three groups, namely, male and female students, and prison inmates were used. Low self-control was predictive of behavioural intentions to do crime for a prison population, but not for students. The proximate determinants of crime, normative influence and perceived control, exerted considerable influence on crime, increasing the explanatory value of self-control theory. The results have implications for including significant others and behavioural control variables in understanding the causes of crime.

Supervisors
Dr Richard Fletcher
Professor Kevin Ronan

Massey Contact Centre Mon - Fri 8:30am to 4:30pm 0800 MASSEY (+64 6 350 5701) TXT 5222 contact@massey.ac.nz Web chat Staff Alumni News Māori @ Massey